Test of a New Kind of Guitar Pick : The Blue Magic Pick

The guitar picks family has a new member for a few weeks now… We’ve all seen a lot of shape and materials variations around the standard guitar pick. But such a radical variation as the Blue Magic Pick is rare.

The Blue Magic Pick was born from the imagination of a guitarist who was experimenting some difficulties with the gypsy jazz pump strumming technique. As a matter of fact this is an interesting creation.

It is made of 3 distinct parts : The head, the body and the scraper. You hold the scraper between the thumb and the index as you would do with a standard pick. The body takes place between the index and the middle finger. The head is here to ensure that the pick won’t fall from the holding hand.

The first grip on the blue magic pick is disturbing. You will have to spend at least 10 to 15 minutes to find your optimal comfort. During this first run you should play scales and motifs on the neck. You should practice alternate picking. And last you should vary the strike angles  on the strings, and the position of the scraper between the thumb and the index. Then you will be set to fully appreciate the Blue Magic Pick. Surprisingly, you almost don’t feel a difference in terms of grip between this pick and un standard guitar pick.

In terms of tone though, the differences are obvious… The notes sound louder than with a comparable standard pick (i.e. same thickness and material). The attacks are precise, and the notes are very well defined without any particular effort from the guitarist. I think the most logical explanation relies on the fact that the body of the Blue Magic Pick forces you to eliminate any uncontrolled slight movements of the thumb and index. So as a consequence it’s the whole holding hand that strikes the strings without any additional efforts.

The Blue Magic Pick is comfortable. You can’t lose it anymore while you play guitar. And for those who like to alternate between the pick and finger picking, you can easily switch the pick to be able to use all the right hand fingers. I found my own way to switch it over my thumb finger but there are other ways to do it.

Now, do I think that the Blue Magic Pick is suitable for any genres and any style of guitar playing ? I can’t be affirmative because I am far from being able to play any kind of guitar  styles. What I can tell though… The Light version of the Blue Magic Pick is perfect for chords strumming kind of technique (either on electric or acoustic guitars). The Heavy version of the Blue Magic Pick is suitable for rhythm or solo playing for blues or heavy rock kind of music.  But I think that it will be more than perfect for jazz styles.

Alternating downstrums and upstrums on chords required more practice than anything else I tried with this pick. But once I figured out the optimal movement, it was ok.

To me there are some limits to the use of the Blue Magic Pick… For example I am still searching for the best way to play funk rhythms with it… Still didn’t find ! I also think that the fast playing lovers, and shredders out there may not find it an ideal tool. I wonder but if you are one of these guys, you’ll figure out whether I am right or wrong by trying these picks.

To conclude, though the Blue Magic Pick won’t become my main pick, it still will join my collection of picks as a tool for certain use. Once you get used to it, you can only appreciate its ergonomics and precision especially to play chords.

For more information on these guitar picks, check the Blue Magic Pick website. The Blue Magic Picks cost €11.90 each.

Here is a short video to show the Blue Magic Pick in action…

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiG5oW_oYy4[/youtube]

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